“Country music likes to think of itself as a family, and this time around, its family was viciously attacked”

The textbook definition of insanity, according to a now familiar cliche, is doing the same thing over and over, and expecting a different result.

The United States is mired in a horrible cycle of massacres. Each time the cycle is repeated, some authority figure tells the public that “now is not the time” to discuss the steps that can be taken to end the carnage. Each time, the chatter dies down, the nation turns its head to the next big issue — a hurricane, corporate income taxes, the latest celebrity gossip — and lets the issue drop. “Now is not the time” is, in practice, double speak for “We don’t intend to do anything.”

So each time the cycle repeats, we get the same result: The nation insanely moves forward, just waiting for the next disaster.

Through each atrocity, the country music community comes together afterward with a well-intended response: benefit concerts, efforts to increase public awareness or, at the very least, heavy-hearted social posts with love for the victims’ families.

Country music likes to think of itself as a family, and this time around, its family was viciously attacked on Oct. 1 in Las Vegas when a renegade gambler turned the Route 91 Harvest Festival into a shooting gallery. The killer used a series of accessories, so-called “bump stocks,” to turn legal firearms into machine guns, which are otherwise banned.

In the aftermath, the cliches were heard again: “Now is not the time.” “Guns don’t kill people; people kill people.”

If the country industry truly cares about its family, now is the time to talk and to take action.

Yes, people kill people, but they frequently use guns to do

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