Emergency management officials, engineers and long-term care providers flagged problems Tuesday with a pair of proposed rules that require nursing homes and assisted living facilities to install generators and have 96 hours of fuel and also took aim at state agencies that drafted the rules for not being more collaborative.

Walton County Emergency Management Director Jeff Goldberg, who traveled to Tallahassee to testify at a hearing about the proposed rules, said he was “disappointed” that the state had largely ignored comments he made about the proposals at a public meeting last month.

“We want to work with you. We want to meet with you, we want to make a good rule, have a good product and something that makes sense. But without a two-way conversation, with us just talking and weeks later getting a draft rule pushed down to us, doesn’t facilitate good cooperation in my opinion,” Goldberg said.

Goldberg said the proposed rules require local emergency-management officials to review plans that detail how facilities are going to meet backup power requirements and to ensure that the facilities are in compliance with the rules. However, local emergency management officials don’t have authority to review the power plans, he said.

Additionally, the rules require emergency management officials to post approved plans on their websites. But Goldberg said he and other local officials are being advised by county attorneys that they can’t post the plans because the plans belong to the providers and not the government.

Gov. Rick Scott‘s administration in September issued emergency rules requiring nursing homes and assisted living facilities to have generators and 96 hours of fuel to keep the buildings cool. The emergency rules were issued after the deaths of eight residents of The Rehabilitation Center of Hollywood Hills following Hurricane Irma, which

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