Tamara Lush, Associated Press
Updated 3:34 pm, Thursday, September 3, 2015

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Photo: Silvia Izquierdo, AP

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Photos of 3-year-old Syrian boy Aylan Kurdi found dead on a Turkish beach are displayed on the front pages of Brazilian newspapers, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. The photo of the body washed up on the sand was splashed on the front of all major newspapers in Brazil, a nation with more homicides than any other, according to the United Nations. Still, the picture ignited despair and indignation.
Photo: Silvia Izquierdo, AP

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Brazilian newspaper covers show the photo of the dead 3-year-old Syrian boy on a Turkish beach, at a news stand in Brasilia, Brazil, Thursday, Sep. 3, 2015. The photo of the body washed up on the sand was splashed on the front of all major newspapers in Brazil, a nation with more homicides than any other, according to the United Nations. Still, the picture ignited despair and indignation.
Photo: Eraldo Peres, AP

Image of dead child on beach haunts and frustrates the world

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The photo of the dead 3-year-old Syrian boy on a Turkish beach is haunting.
It captures everything we don’t want to see when we tap our phones or open our newspapers: a vicious civil war, a surge of refugees, the death of an innocent.
The image of little Aylan Kurdi is hammering home the Syrian migrant crisis to the world, largely through social media. Aylan died along with his 5-year-old brother and their mother when their small rubber boat capsized as it headed for Greece.
“It is a very painful picture to view,” said Peter Bouckaert, who as director of emergencies at Human Rights Watch has witnessed his fair share of painful scenes. “It had me in tears when it first showed up on my mobile phone. I had to think hard whether to share this.”
But share, he did. Bouckaert, who is in Hungary watching the crisis unfold, said people need to be pushed to look at the “ghastly spectacle” so they can, in turn, prod governments to help the suffering Syrian people.
Still, will the disturbing image galvanize people into action? Will it …Read More