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Vice President Joe Biden said Tuesday he will not run for president in 2016
Biden said his window of opportunity had closed before he was emotionally ready to run

With his wife, Jill, and President Barack Obama at his side in the White House Rose Garden, Biden said the window for a successful campaign “has closed,” noting his family’s grief following the death of his son, Beau.

Still, Biden, who a spokesman said made his decision Tuesday night, positioned himself as a defender of the Obama legacy, implicitly suggesting that he still views himself as the best possible successor to the President.
In tone, the remarks sounded like the kind of speech defending staunch Democratic values that he might have given had he reached the opposite conclusion.
The vice president sent a pointed warning to the Democratic front-runner in his remarks, again apparently rebuking her for her comment in last week’s CNN Democratic debate that Republicans were her enemies.

“I believe that we have to end the divisive partisan politics that is ripping this country apart, and I think we can,” said Biden, who, though a crafty partisan, often worked across the aisle during nearly four decades in the Senate.
“It’s mean spirited, it’s petty, and it’s gone on for much too long. I don’t believe, like some do, that it’s naive to talk to Republicans. I don’t think we should look at Republicans as our enemies. They are our opposition. They’re not our enemies.”
He added: “For the sake of the country, we have to work together.”

‘I will not be silent’
“While I will not be a candidate, I will not be silent,” he said in a speech that highlighted Democratic themes on income inequality along with a call for a national movement to cure cancer. “I intend to speak out clearly and forcefully, to influence as much as I can where we stand as a party and where we need to go as a nation.”
The question of whether Biden, 72, would enter the race has consumed Democrats for months, but in recent days, the vice president’s long period of deliberation had begun to frustrate some in the party — and there was rising pressure for him to declare his intentions.
PHOTOS: Joe Biden’s political life
The prospect of a run seemed to decline further after Clinton’s commanding performance at the first Democratic presidential debate on October 13. …Read More

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