Nearly three-quarters of Florida voters say they could not vote for a candidate who has been accused of sexual misconduct, according to a new statewide public opinion poll conducted by Gravis Marketing of Winter Springs.

Gravis found almost widespread agreement on that position. Voters broken down by nearly all age groups, genders, religious affiliations, races, and education backgrounds overwhelmingly agreed with that position. Overall, 72 percent of registered voters polled said they could not vote for someone accused of sexual misconduct, while 28 percent said they could, and almost all demographic breakouts showed at least 65 percent also saying they could not vote for someone accused of sexual misconduct.

However, differences emerged among political beliefs, with Republicans and conservatives, who may still be suspicious of the issue following the Alabama U.S. Senate special election two weeks ago, offering far less certainty on that question.

Among Republicans, 46 percent said, yes, they could vote for a candidate accused of sexual misconduct. Those who called themselves “conservative” or “very conservative” weighed in at 46 and 47 percent yes, respectively.

Among Democrats, 87 percent said they could not vote for a candidate accused of sexual misconduct, and among independents, 74 percent said they could not.

The findings were among several public opinion issues Gravis polled last week in matters also including gay marriage, needle sharing, greyhound dog racing, the federal tax reform law approved by Congress and signed by President Donald Trump last week, gambling, gay conversion therapy, and the performances of Gov. Rick Scott and Trump to prepare for and respond to Hurricane Irma back in September.

Gravis reported it conducted a random survey of 5,778 registered voters from Dec. 19-24, citing a margin of error of 1.3 percent.

Many of the queried

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