With THC crystals reaching close to 100 percent THC, we didn’t think weed could get much stronger. That is until we discovered THC-O-acetate, another psychoactive cannabinoid, said to be two to three times more potent than the THC we’re accustomed to. If that doesn’t sound intense enough for you, THC-O-acetate is made from THC in the same way that heroin is made from morphine. Here’s everything we know about THC-O-acetate.

History Of THC-O-Acetate Use

THC-O-acetate is the acetate ester of THC. Research on the cannabinoid is limited, but it was featured in a couple of studies between 1950 and 1980.

Technically, THC acetate is not a scheduled substance. However, it could be considered an analogue of Delta-9 THC. The Federal Analogue Act of 1986 made it so that any analogues of THC would be considered federally illegal. It is currently unclear whether or not THC-O fits the criteria.

Between 1949 and 1975, the U.S. Army Chemical Crops conducted human experiments at the Edgewood Arsenal facility in Maryland. THC acetate ester was used on dogs to test the substance’s potential as a non-lethal incapacitating agent. Researchers found that it had twice the ability to throw off dog’s muscle coordination when compared to delta-9 THC.

According to Donald A. Cooper of the DEA, THC-O-acetate was first encountered by the administration in 1978. That year, they came across THC-O-acetate extracts in Jacksonville, Florida.

Since that encounter, DEA laboratories have never seen another sample of the acetate. There was talk of classifying it as a controlled substance analogue. However, 10 years later the suggestion was dropped since the THC acetate they found ended up being an isolated incident.

The cannabis concentrate was made using a Soxhlet extractor. Cooper noted that the THC-O-acetate the DEA found was made using the same technique that turns morphine

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