Hillary Clinton | Getty

As the State Department prepares to release 6,000 more messages, the cast of characters grows.
By Rachael Bade and Josh Gerstein
9/1/15, 9:27 AM CET
Updated 9/1/15, 9:27 AM CET

On Monday, Hillary Clinton’s friends, aides, interrogators and anyone else wrapped up in the ongoing drama surrounding her email practices as secretary of state will be poring over the largest release yet of messages from the first four years of the Obama administration.
Her decision to use a private server, and whether that decision violated any State Department rules, has become the most intricate Clinton controversy since the long-running 1990s Whitewater land scandal, and the cast of characters in the drama continues to proliferate. Fueled by political rivals on the campaign trail and Republicans in Congress, the dispute has led to lawsuits, inspectors general investigations and an FBI inquiry, and now has federal judges and committee chairs on Capitol Hill demanding answers about who knew what, when.

That clamor is expected only to grow with more than 6,000 pages of emails set to be posted on the agency’s website Monday, in accordance with a judge’s order requiring monthly releases under the Freedom of Information Act.
The list of those drawn into the saga includes some of Clinton’s top aides at the State Department, now playing roles in her Democratic campaign for the presidency. They were among the ones who forwarded sensitive messages to Clinton that have raised national security questions. A few bit players merely helped her set up or store material from the private email system, operated out of her New York home. Fanning the flames are a growing list of officials questioning Clinton’s conduct and demanding more information.
In recent months, Clinton dismissed the email controversy as politically spawned and aimed at hurting her reputation. Last Wednesday, she seemed to shift her tone, saying that she took responsibility for her use of a private account and that “it clearly wasn’t the best choice.” On Friday, she called the situation “complicated.”
Many of the players in the email imbroglio would surely agree:

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